Study of lighting and low vision in older people

We investigated the influence of lighting on performance at activities of daily living in 24 older people with low vision from cataract and/or macular degeneration.

Participants carried out four everyday tasks, each at three illuminances: 50 lux, 200 lux, and 800 lux. Both objective performance and subjective preference were recorded. Subjects tend to perform better under brighter conditions, but the average results masked large individual variations. Indeed, most participants showed a large effect of lighting on performance in at least one task, but the optimal light level varied idiosyncratically from one subject to another. The best approach to provide optimal lighting for older people with low vision may be to individually assess their preference and performance at different light levels.

BJW Evans, BSc PhD FCOptom FAAO – Neville Chappell Research Clinic, Institute of Optometry, 56-62 Newington Causeway London, SE1 6DS, UK, Department of Optometry & Visual Science, City University, Northampton Square London, EC1 0HB, UK

H. Sawyerr – Neville Chappell Research Clinic, Institute of Optometry, 56-62 Newington Causeway London, SE1 6DS, UK

Z. Jessa, BSc MCOptom – Neville Chappell Research Clinic, Institute of Optometry, 56-62 Newington Causeway London, SE1 6DS, UK, Department of Optometry & Visual Science, City University, Northampton Square London, EC1 0HB, UK

S. Brodrick, IEng ACIBSE MSLL – Lighting Solutions, 5 The Croft, Marsh Baldon, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX44 9LN, UK

AI Slater, BSc MPhil FSLL CEng MCIBSE – Thomas Pocklington Trust, 5 Castle Row, Horticultural Place, Chiswick, London, W4 4JQ, UK

Found in: Lighting Research and Technology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 103-119 (2010)

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